Seattle Snowmageddon

February arrived like it usually does with grey skies and 40F daytime temperatures. When the rest of the US got hit with a polar vortex that sent temperatures plummeting into the -60F wind chill (been in that, not fun, never wanna feel that again!), Seattle was business as usual.

http://bukitharapan.org/?real=Levitra-Buy-Uk as final preparations were being made for the service, hundreds of people who were forced from their costo priligy in Then, six days in, we got hit with a mild case of polar air. 17F is pretty cold for this region. Still, nothing a cup of hot cocoa and a warm blanket can’t fix.

| instock🔥 |. What You are Looking Best pill? ☀☀☀ What Is The Cost Of Viagra At Cvs ☀☀☀,Are You Searching Best pill?. Buy Now » On February 8, Seattle woke up to a rare, big snowfall that lasted until the 9th. The railing outside my porch wound up with around six inches of the white stuff! Our snowfalls are typically around one or two inches.

Seattle image from MSN 2-8-19

6 Where To Buy Diflucan Over The Counter 7 lansoprazole 15mg buy I need to charge up my phone help for homework That deal envisaged the Bakries Now usually this stuff melts after a day since we hover near 40F during the daytime. But at six to eight inches, it would take a few days. Not really a big deal since this fell over the weekend and my tooth appointment wasn’t until Tuesday. I wasn’t worried.

| Discounts🔥 |. Low Cost. Pill Shop, Cheap Prices. Free samples for all orders. ☀☀☀ Buy Priligy Dapoxetine ☀☀☀,Free Shipping, quality. More snow was forecast for Sunday afternoon and through Monday. What are the odds of accumulation in Seattle? Not too high, normally. Except outside looked like this:

Traffic camera 2-11-19

And there was no sign of it stopping. The roughly three inches that melted were quickly replenished. At that point, I knew there was no way we were getting out of our driveway. No shovel and a muscle car = snowed in!

Traffic camera 2-10-19

When you have steep hills like this, and nothing in the neighborhood gets plowed, we wind up with no food delivery on Sunday, no trash pickup on Monday, and no tooth appointment on Tuesday.

Nobody could get in and nobody could get out. Which presented a minor food problem since the food truck couldn’t get into the subdivision on Sunday during our normal delivery and we couldn’t go out to fetch anything.

Advice is http://broadwayinsurancegroup.com/pharmacy/sandrena/, Advice is cialis or viagra cheaper 🔥 L~1970’s metal mesh backless top, size S. Burberry silk skirt, size 6. C~St. John Couture knit dress with crystals and fringe, size 8. R~Donna Karan sequin stretch dress, size 0-4. Hubby: We’re snowed in! We’ll starve. Maybe I should call Pizza Hut and see if they can get in…

Propecia Finasteride Online Me: I think you underestimate the amount of food we have in the house.

I drag out the box of pancake mix, two packages of bacon, and one tube of Pillsbury breakfast biscuits. With iron resolve, I look up recipes on making the dreaded gravy — something I tried long ago and failed miserably at. See, I grew up around women who could just toss that stuff in the drippings and whip up something that tastes awesome. Not me though. My attempts tasted like raw flour (eww)! I’ve had a hatred of flour ever since.

2:2:2 – two tablespoons of drippings, two tablespoons of flour, and two cups of cold milk. Who knew that was the secret to making gravy. Yeah, ok, to be fair when I asked experts about this, they gave me look and feel guidelines rather than actual measurements which would have helped a newbie. It also helped to watch a video that showed how long you are supposed to cook it. I love the internet for recipe instructions.

Aha! I made my first EDIBLE gravy and conquered my flour phobia once and for all!

Biscuits and gravy are fine, but wouldn’t last long. Thankfully, I also had one frozen pound of beef. No problem, I can make golden curry with rice.

Problem – no rice! It seems the hubby was being nice when he filled the smaller bag from the bigger bag, only he didn’t tell me, so I assumed I still had big bag rice left. Whoops!

No problem – I added a can of diced tomatoes and potatoes to the golden curry and it turned out even better than ever! Good thing because the snow kept on coming until late Tuesday, early Wednesday.

Traffic camera 2-12-19

The city roads have been plowed, and they still look like a bad idea to be driving on them. I looked up our city’s winter equipment which would make a Midwesterner laugh:

  • Three 5-yard truck with Plow/Material Spreader
  • One 5-yard truck Plow/900 Gallon Liquid Anti-icing Applicator Trucks
  • One 5-yard truck 900 Gallon Liquid Anti-icing Applicator Trucks
  • One 1-Ton 400 Gallon Liquid Anti-icing Applicator Truck/Material Spreader Truck/Plow
  • Two 9000 Gallon CCB Tanks
  • One 140-Ton Salt Shed

Accumulation is so rare out here that I had fun watching the neighbor and two helpers try to get his car out of the driveway using a spade, a hoe (I kid you not!), and one rare unicorn snow shovel. At this point there was a foot of snow everywhere. Amazingly, his front wheel drive car made it into the street and past my house. Later though, the car returned, having been defeated at the steep curvy section leading out of the subdivision. So close!

After a few false flickers, the power finally went out Wednesday. Nothing says boredom like having no power. My high end laptop sucks battery juice faster than an athlete downing Gatorade, so writing was out. I could read on my Kindle, but the air temperature was cooling and I found playing pretend mummy and napping was the best course of action. Nobody dared open the fridge because who knew how long the power would be out?

Downtown Bellevue

It wound up being eight hours or so. Ah, electricity, how I missed thee! As an added bonus, the overworked city snow plows finally got to our subdivision for Valentine’s Day, so Safeway was able to sneak in a small delivery. Nothing says Happy Valentine’s Day like having more meat to make more food with glorious electricity restored!

I would like to call out Safeway for their awesome customer service. Their drivers kept trying to deliver even when the conditions were bad. They also tossed in free flowers on Friday when we finally got a real order delivered because their normal roses that the hubby ordered were in bad shape.

Also a big thanks to the city snow plow and electric crews who had to work in a foot of the white stuff through five plus days of snowmageddon.

Our front yard had some casualties in all of this. Oddly enough, it happened once the snow began melting and the ground softened. The front bush was so weighted down unevenly, that it pulled up from the ground. I’m not sure if it can be restored yet. Several other bushes were also pulled forward, but their bases looked solid, so I think they’ll recover. However, the front tree wasn’t so lucky. It has four trunks shooting up from the ground and the front, major one snapped off at the base. It’s going to look pretty sad come spring.

I found a recap of events from https://www.seattleweatherblog.com/snow/february-2019-seattles-snowiest-month-50-years/

click here February 2019 snowfall by the numbers (as of 6 p.m. Feb. 11)

Total: 20.2 inches

  • 1.0 inches on Feb. 3
  • 1.7 inches on Feb. 4 (tied daily record from 1949)
  • 6.4 inches on Feb. 8 (daily record)
  • 1.5 inches on Feb. 9
  • 3.5 inches on Feb. 10
  • 6.1 inches on Feb. 11 (daily record)

That makes this month the snowiest February since 1916!

It’s now ten days since the snowmageddon and there are still pockets of sullen white stuff lingering in the shadowy spaces. But it’s the end of February and the worst is over, right?

Snow might hit us again before February is over!

Magic 8 ball says…

Don’t count on it!

New Paranormal Release

Click to buy on Amazon

I had a plan. It involved a short story and a Halloween release date. My characters said screw that and did their own thing. The result is a novella (almost 30k words) that took a bit longer to write, but I think the end result was worth the wait.

This story is set one year after Adrian saved his Lenore in The Vampire’s Raven. Marcus, the necromancer, made a brief appearance then. Now he gets his own adventure involving souls and demons… lots of demons.

Click to see more about the Seattle Underground

I had fun abusing the Seattle Underground. It seemed the perfect place to hide bodies and demons. If you are ever in the area, you should take the tour. It’s not as bad as I wrote it (creative license and all). Actually, it’s a fascinating piece of Seattle history.

Both stories tie into a series I will be writing in the future sometime after the Summoner series is done.

Speaking of Summoner – I’m back to editing what I’ve already written and tweaking things so that stuff leads into other stuff more smoothly. Love the vague? Gotta avoid spoilers! I don’t have itchy skin, cracked teeth, or holidays to get in the way, so it’s full steam ahead!


To order The Demon Soul Invasion from Amazon click this link: https://amzn.to/2T4DmXz

To order it on Barnes & Noble, Kobo, or other, click this link: https://books2read.com/u/47xk7q

Storytelling in Games

I’ve enjoyed playing World of Warcraft for many years. Released in 2004, the gameplay and graphics have gone through several improvements. But perhaps the most dramatic leap is with their story telling and cinematics. With the latest Blizzcon (convention where Blizzard fans meet up), I saw some new cinematics which gave me the idea for this blog.

First, a little background. World of Warcraft sprang from Warcraft: Orcs & Humans and its sequels, which were Horde vs Alliance real time strategy games. When Blizzard put out the massively multiplayer game, World of Warcraft, it already had a large back story from its predecessors. Each race has a unique culture and belief system and lives in different areas from forests or mountains to an underground steampunk-like city. The attention to detail is on par with anything you’d read in epic fantasy, including a timeline that spans several thousand years.

Early on, the quests were simple, the non-player characters (NPCs) didn’t have voice overs, and not all the quests were connected to anything remotely interesting beyond that NPC’s need to get bear steaks. They were a means to level up your character and not usually much beyond that. There were a few detailed quest chains, but they were rare. And while I defintely geeked out on the epic Onyxia quest chain, especially the NPC walking through Stormwind, there wasn’t a lot of meat to the story telling that would intrigue an author.

Today, the technology to tell a story in the game has improved to the point where we have voice over for many characters, animated cutscenes to show you what is happening, and movie-quality cinematics for special occasions. This also gave rise to an added level of quality in the story telling. I think it also helps that they now have authors like Christie Golden contributing to the team.

Here’s what a quest chain is like today in WoW:

And for completeness sake, here’s the Horde side:

It’s almost like being a participant in a choose your own adventure story (remember those?) Except most games are still pretty linear and don’t allow you to play sides unless you are a Bioware game which has good and evil decision trees. I do remember quite fondly playing Knights of the Old Republic (KoTOR) and finding out I’d been duped. I went from a goodie-two-shoes Jedi to raging Sith Lord in under three seconds which wound up thoroughly crashing my save file. I had to limp along to the finish line and never did get to see my ending ceremony… not that I’m bitter at all… no, really… ok, maybe there’s still some agitation! But can you blame me? I poured over sixty hours of my life into that game in only a few days time because story immersion is very addictive and I’m very susceptible. Anyway, back to WoW…

In stories, every action has an associated reaction. Just think if you came from a culture of honor in battle and you had an unwilling part in burning innocents. A picture is worth a thousand words, but this video is worth several thousand.

You don’t need to know anything about these people to feel their pain. It’s spelled out quite clearly in their words and actions. This is a pretty deep character development piece for a video game. I instantly wanted to create a troll because he rocked. I also have a crush on Saurfang ever since several expansions back when he was nice to me as a Horde character while the current leader of the Horde was a complete ass.

Now we get to the actual battle which is another impressive piece of CGI work. I really want Blizzard to do a CGI movie. Heck, we almost have a movie here with all these cutscenes and cinematics and quests.

And speaking of quests, the continuation of this story takes place by questing in the game. This is over twenty minutes of story telling that I’d compare pretty favorably to any of the battles in HBO’s Game of Thrones. You’ll notice the in-game cutscenes aren’t as highly detailed as the movie-quality cinematics. That’s because they use in-game rendering to make everything. It not only shortens the time it takes to make them so gamers can enjoy more of them, it saves on disk space and download speed.

I don’t expect you to watch everything, but it’s very useful as an author to study how story like this is presented. It only takes a few words to evoke passion and immerse the participant in what’s going on. Also, I’m going through there (I played both factions) on my character, casting spells (I’m a mage) and taking damage from that green poison while trying to rescue allies. That makes it even easier to hook the participant into the story.

And there’s this big cliffhanger at the end of all that which was left unresolved until Blizzcon finally revealed what happened with Saurfang (yay!!). Even in games I don’t like cliffies! Here goes:

As writers, we have our work cut out for us in trying to generate such emotion since we don’t have the benefit of body language. With a single table toss, you got that Saurfang was pissed. That’s harder to do with only words, but doable. My current protagonist slammed his hands against the table and stood so fast the chair scraped against the metal flooring. It gets the point across well enough.

However, music is far more potent, which is why movies use it. A soundtrack can eviscerate the heart with a few carefully crafted notes.

The voice actor for Jaina Proudmoore, Laura Bailey, sang the following song live at Blizzcon. This is a haunting song that kills me every time I hear it, but to see the emotion in her eyes while she sang it… yeah… anyone have a tissue or three? It was especially interesting because Laura said she uses her fear and vulnerability when singing in front of an audience to evoke that quiver in her voice. Also, another person on the panel talked about how the Russian version used real sailors for the male voices.

And finally, I include a cinematic about an enemy to both the Horde and Alliance because this is so creepy and another excellent work. Plus, it was mentioned in the Blizzcon discussion panel on cinematics. The person on that panel who was involved, got excited when she learned it was going to be horror. I hope you enjoy!

Let Not the Paperback Go Unchanged!

Last month I displayed the new cover for the eBook. As the days passed, the paperback cover began pleading with me to fancy it up as well. So I finally caved and began working on the full wraparound version. What’s that look like? Well, here goes:

Dang, doesn’t that look sexy! I’m quite pleased with how it turned out. Now I just have to iron out a few more nits and it will be available for purchase.

This might not mean anything to you unless you are also an indie publisher, but recently Amazon took the final step to migrate all books on CreateSpace (CS) to Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP). Ah CS, how I already miss thee. The migration was easy enough but I ran into problems when I went to update the cover and interior on KDP.

Interestingly enough, the cover template used for CS is the same one KDP gives you, yet their book is a teensy tiny bit smaller which means I had to move the back text in a bit to keep it from being lopped off. I got a proof copy (a physical copy of the book before it gets published) and stacked it on top of the older CS copy and you can see the slight shrinkage in both height and width, though the spine seems the same. Same parent company, same POD printer hardware (or so I thought), slightly different size. Hmm…. Easy enough to fix, but I was definitely surprised by this.

I expected issues with the interior manuscript. The original reason I published the paperback using CS was because, back in November, 2017, I started getting an error when uploading the manuscript. CS happily accepted it, but KDP spit it back out with a generic error that was completely unhelpful. Being the impatient, excited newbie author that I was, I avoided the issue by going with CS. Well, now that avoidance is biting me in the butt! There’s probably a life lesson here about trying to use shortcuts. Oh well. Now I have to dig in and discover the means to fix this (meaning beg KDP people to look into it!) so I can finally have the updated book for everyone to repurchase because it’s just that awesome! (Kidding. No, really. But if you want to buy a second version, I won’t stop you!)

And there’s a fun glimpse into the trenches of indie publishing. I hope you enjoyed it! 🙂

New Summoner Cover!

The internet is a really cool way to connect people across the globe. Yet, for all its awesomeness, these connections can be too easily severed when someone goes offline for whatever reason and you never hear from them again. I’ve had this happen several times over the years I’ve been online gaming, and once again it struck when The Summoner’s cover designer’s web site shut down with no idea of what happened and no way of finding out. I hope he’s OK because he did a really great job of Frankensteining at least six separate stock photos to create the original cover that still graces the paperback version.

While it’s a great cover, it doesn’t really strongly brand the series — something I decided I wanted when I put book 2 out. So I asked a new designer to touch up the cover and do some magic with the branding. See the result for yourself:

Click to buy on Amazon

Looks pretty cool, huh? 🙂 And there’s no doubt this is book 1 in a series. I’m really pleased with the look and plan to use this designer going forward — he makes such epic fantasy illustrations, that I want to hang them as posters on my wall! Now I just need to finish book 2.

And on that note…

I took a small break from writing this past month, which is ultimately a good thing. See, I’m not one of those plot everything ahead of time writers. I explore the story and get to know my characters as they react to situations and sometimes surprise me. While I know the main characters pretty well, I have several new characters and more fleshed out side characters that needed some loving. So, while it means no book out for summer which is a bummer, it does mean that when it does come out, it will hopefully be well worth the wait.

May the rest of the summer be free of Mother Nature’s wrath and may yours be enjoyable! I need to get back to writing… so blog you again next month! 🙂

The Hugo Wrap Up

I didn’t get as much writing done as I wanted to this month. Part of that was the summer warmth that arrived which makes it hard to do anything but enjoy the short Pacific NW summer while it lasts. I’m an oddball and love hot as long as it doesn’t come with humidity, which is pretty much the norm out here. Funny story – we are in a drought. Yup, this here rainforest-y area which gets regular rainfall most of the year is experiencing a drought. But this always happens in the summer. It’s like nature flips a switch from cool and rainy to warm, sunny, and very dry. I’ve had to water my plants so they don’t shrivel into brown nubs. However, this year, the July drought time has been exceptionally dry. The only precipitation we had this month was on the first when we got 0.05″.  I think I could spit and produce that much moisture! Check it out: Rainfall in Seattle 2018. Don’t say we are always rainy because July and August will shoot that theory down.

The other reason for a slowdown in writing was for a fun cause: I was busy reading through the Hugo nominations. This entire process begins around December when I freak out and remember I want to do the Hugo thing. I frantically worry about the deadline to apply to the Worldcon in time to do the nominations. So far, I’ve managed to make it under the deadline, whew, then I have to compile a list of all the books I’ve read the past year so I can submit up to six per category. No problem! Um. Well. Maybe. I read A LOT. Even after becoming an author, I still manage to read A LOT, just not as much as before. So from Feb to March, I scramble to submit a list of books, movies, and TV shows I think represent the best of science fiction and fantasy. No pressure!

I tend to read a lot of indie books these days in a feeble attempt to reduce my book spending. As a reading addict, I have to draw the line somewhere! That means many of my nominations are for indie authors who really don’t have much of a shot at winning a nomination spot since the people who sign up to vote are usually into shorts published in magazines and trad pubbed books. Stinks for me if I ever wanted to try for a Hugo (hey, one day it could happen!) or see my favorite indie authors win, but great for my reader self since I don’t get a chance to read a lot of trad pubs these days.

So sometime in March, we submit our nominations and then they come back to us in May with the top six in each category that we have to do a final rank vote on by the end of July. Best part about signing up to do all this: you get a packet with most of the books that made the final round! Cost: $50. Value: way more than that. Then I have to squeeze time in to read all that which meant July became pretty hectic.

In the past few years the nominations were tainted by drama. Fortunately, this year the choices were all very good. Of course, that made it difficult to choose who got that top slot. But that’s a problem I’m happy to have!

If you want my run down of the nominees and my initial thoughts, go here: http://www.thegoldenelm.org/hugo-nominations-2017/

If you want to find out more about the Hugo nominations, go here:
http://www.thehugoawards.org/

Chameleon is out!

Back in April, I wrote a science fiction short story introducing another member of my ragtag team of techno rebels that will star in a series I have yet to write (cross your fingers for 2019). This protagonist’s name is Chameleon, Chamo for short, and she’s a genius computer hacker with an addiction to the difficult and impossible. The story starts off with her in the middle of a data heist when she gets wind of the ultimate challenge. She’s definitely going to be the trouble maker of the team.

Like Biting Shadow, this story is in another anthology called The Renegade which just came out. So yay! You can check it out here.

It’s fun to take small detours like this where I can get a tiny bit of world building done while still working on my fantasy series. Eventually, I’ll have the entire team assembled. 🙂

I’ve also been reading/watching this year’s Hugo nominations. I love doing this because it exposes me to movies, shows, and books that I might have missed.

One surprise I’d like to call out is Season 4, Episode 1 of Black Mirror called USS Callister. You can find it on Netflix and just wow. If Star Trek: Original mated with Twilight Zone and had a baby, this would be its name. I had heard about this series but never watched any of the episodes until this week. If you really enjoy creepy horror involving future technology that’s far beyond our reach, then this show is for you.

You can check out all the nominations and my reviews as I finish them here.

That’s all for now. Enjoy the 4th if you are in the US, summer if you are on the topside of the planet, and winter if you are down below! 🙂

The Fierce Beauty of Pele’s Wrath

As I thought about what to write in the blog this month, my mind kept wandering back to the images of Kilauea that have been in the news lately. I have a friend who lives on one of the smaller islands, so my interest in Hawaii comes naturally.

Actually, it started sooner than that. I read a children’s book a long (long, long!) time ago about Pele, the goddess responsible for volcanic activity according to the local lore. I wish I remembered the name of that book, but it had lava flowing towards a girl’s house but it stopped in time.

Pele was kinder in the book than she is right now for many people living on the Big Island who have already lost their homes. Although, she is kind in that nobody has died. Unlike in movies, this volcano’s lava is slow enough that people can escape it.

As a writer, I’m fascinated by the way the lava hardens at the surface but still slowly oozes forward to form folded layers. Nature’s sculptures I call them. Truly beautiful and like nothing I’ve seen before.

The other thing I learned about volcanoes is they don’t always explode from a single cone at the top and spew lava down the sides. This one has twenty plus fissures all spewing lava that’s reshaping the landscape. It’s striking how deep the lava is when you see the images of it on the road.

Volcanoes are beautiful to look at from afar, but they pollute the air with ash and deadly gasses. You get volcanic fog (vog) from the fissures and lava haze (laze) when lava hits the ocean and creates steam filled with sulfuric acid and tiny glass crystals.

There’s definitely a lot of good research material here for whenever I need a volcano in a story. The pictures here are indeed worth a thousand words and I’m grateful for the technology that can capture these images without risk to people.

My thoughts and prayers go out to all who are affected by this. I hope everyone stays safe and is able to find new housing if they’ve lost theirs.

Mahalo.

These images are copied from the online news articles that appear on MSN.

I have a video on YouTube!

I never thought in a million years I’d post a video on YouTube. Nor did I ever consider making book trailers. Then I saw a forum post about a year’s worth of free Lumen5 Pro with no strings attached and said, sure why not.

I love trying out new software and Lumen5 was surprisingly easy to use. It’s a web based application that has a large collection of photos, videos, and music soundtracks that you can choose from. You can point it to a web page and let it import the text for you to click and add to your video, or you can manually type everything in.

I tested it out with the Summoner book page on this website and clicked away on the text it imported, kind of willy nilly that first time just to see what would happen. Lumen5 used keywords from each sentence to pull up images or videos from its collection that was surprisingly appropriate at times.

I selected an epic sounding piece of music and walah! I had a video that looked fairly professional. After the initial high, I trimmed the wording down and used some of my own Dreamstime images to get a true fantasy vibe. But best of all, because I wanted to add it to Goodreads, I had to upload it to YouTube! Me. Adding a video. To YouTube! Unbelievable. That was actually ridiculously easy since I already had a YouTube + gmail account.

I’ve posted it just about anywhere I can because it’s that awesome, including in the Fun Vids section on this website. Check it out yourself:

Summoner Video on YouTube

In other news, I’ve submitted a newly finished science fiction short story titled ‘Chamo’ to an anthology. Like Biting Shadow, this is another character introduction to the group of defenders that will have to find a way to defeat the emperor and restore freedom to the empire. These shorts are good for me to do because I spend a little time fleshing out the series concept while coming up with some fun characters to write about. Plus, they don’t take too much time away from writing Summoner book 2.

Speaking of book 2, I just finished up a nice battle in chapter 9 and am almost done with chapter 10. This puts the story at around the one-third finished point. With no further distractions in the near future, I should make solid headway. My goal is to get this book published in June.

And that is how this author had fun this month! I hope your April went as well for you. 🙂

My Science Fiction Influencers

Last month I talked about my fantasy influencers. I’ll always enjoy reading fantasy because it’s about things we don’t have like magic or fantastic creatures. But speculating on what our society will be like in the future is also great fun. So this month, I’d like to talk about the science fiction authors who inspired me.

Isaac Asimov

Isaac Asimov was the master of both short and long fiction, and was probably the most prolific author of all time (all but one Dewey Decimal category covered!). He also had some insightful ideas of not only future technology but about the way society might evolve and change.

Most of his stories were written in our universe and spanned thousands of years. My idea for the Darklight Universe comes from this concept. With millions of stars and planets, they can easily share the same universe. Sharing like this can lead to cool intersections.

The Caves of Steel begins the whole I, Robot related series of books involving a human police detective who hates robots and is naturally partnered with a humanoid looking robot. You may have seen the movie, but there are several books involving this duo as they solve crimes involving the three laws of robotics. Not only are the logic puzzles they solve interesting, the backdrop of futuristic societies on Earth and other planets is a fascinating addition.

The human detective eventually passes away and R. Daneel Olivaw has to face his ‘feelings’ about his friend dying. Civilization continues, and a man called Hari Seldon develops psychohistory–a means of studying human behavior as a whole and using that to predict the future. That whole Facebook – Cambridge Analytica fiasco reminded me of a precursor to psychohistory. (Ok, maybe a real embryonic form of it). Hari has his own drama in trying to keep his invention from nefarious groups who would abuse it. And guess what–R. Daneel Olivaw appears again to encourage Hari to develop his science so humanity can prosper. He winds up having the most important role. Who would have thought it in those robot detective stories?

I loved how both robots and humanity evolved over the centuries. But Asimov didn’t only write about our civilization. Probably one of the most poignant stories about humanity’s behavior came from a group of people living on a planet with six suns. They never saw nighttime except once every 2000 years. Imagine the chaos! Or simply read Nightfall!

The other thing I took away from reading Asimov was the philosophy of writing short stories that had a strong punch to them at the end. I am still awed by how much feeling I had when reading Eyes Do More Than See. That story is only around 930 words, yet it is complete and satisfying.

Arthur C. Clarke

Another major influence on me was Arthur C. Clarke, mainly for his scientific ideas that seemed achievable. In fact, while Yuri Artsutinov was the inventor of the space tether, it was Clarke who popularized the idea when he published The Fountains of Paradise. And now this is an actual thing we could do. Same with modern satellites and internet.

He was also a master of telling stories. I think everyone has heard of 2001: A Space Odyssey, or at least the Stanley Kubrick movie where HAL says in a calm voice. “What are you doing Dave?” The movie, at the beginning, was very confusing if you didn’t read the book, but it’s an interesting look into aliens perhaps influencing our evolution. And just when you think it’s all about figuring out a homicidal computer… the aliens become a thing again!

I liked how Clarke presented a more positive view of aliens than other books at the time, or even today. Rendezvous With Rama was a nice change of pace where scientists worked together to explore an alien unknown. No murderous intent, just that feeling of wonder and uncertainty.

Childhood’s End is another story that presents aliens in a non-threatening light. What I enjoyed most is that the story doesn’t go like you think it will. I like taking tropes and turning them sideways or upside down.

 

Clarke also wrote several short stories. I enjoyed these because he always had a good eye to what science might be able to do and incorporated that.

 

C. J. Cherryh

I learned a lot about writing alien cultures by reading books by C. J. Cherryh. Her cat people (hani) have a comprehensive culture that feels very realistic. Same with the atevi in Foreigner.  She’s usually got a human in with the aliens to connect with readers, but I think her depiction of alien societies is so well done she didn’t need the humans.

I loved her work so much that I scrounged used book stores to get many of her titles. At least it looks like all her stuff is available on Kindle now, including the The Complete Morgain (Morgain Cycle), which is a combination of time travel and science fiction with a fantasy vibe.

Roger Zelazny

Speaking of mixing science fiction with fantasy, I have to mention Roger Zelazny. Unfortunately, a lot of his work is paperback only, like Lord of the Light. A group of colonists use technology and Hindu religion to become the gods their ancestors worshiped. One person stands against them and their oppression of the colonists.

Then, there’s the Amber series. The main character, Corwin, has no memory of who he is and is living on Earth until an assassination attempt spurs him to discover who he is and what strange powers he has. Amber is the original world through which all others are mere shadows, including Earth. Corwin and his people can use Tarot cards to talk to one another and journey through the card. They can also use their mental powers to carve a path through the various worlds by making slight modifications as they walk until the scenery matches their destination.

Yes, it’s fantasy with some modern technology thrown in. However, many of his stories, long and short, contain a blend of science fiction and fantasy which I found pretty fun to read. Also, his stuff is imaginative and the descriptions are really vivid.

There are many other great science fiction writers like James P. Hogan, Anne McCaffrey (Ship Who Sang series), Philip K. Dick, Frank Herbert, Douglas Adams, Neal Stephenson, and Ann Leckie (my current favorite). I encourage you to check them out!